22 Jello Flavors (Full List Of Most Loved Flavors)

Since Jell-O was launched in 1897, Jell-O has greatly influenced how Americans cook and present several dishes and desserts.

With such success, it is no wonder that Jell-O has ventured to create several flavors over the years. While some flavors have been discontinued, many Jell-O flavors have proven to be crowd favorites.

If you are wondering what Jell-O flavors are available in the market today, it is good to remember that Jell-O goes by twenty-two staple flavors, and here is a complete list of Jell-O flavors.

Jello Flavors


1. Jell-O Apricot

Jell-O Apricot was launched somewhere between 1975 and 1978 around the same time that Jell-O Peach and Jell-O Blackberry made a comeback in the market.

At present, Jell-O Apricot contains only 2% artificial flavors with the primary ingredients being sugar and gelatin. Moreover, Jell-O Apricot uses Yellow 6 for food coloring.

Additionally, Jell-O Apricot is a popular flavor when making Jello salad and can be served plain, topped with whipped cream, or garnished with fresh apricot wedges.

2. Jell-O Berry Blue

Jell-O Berry Blue was launched in 1992 and during that time, Jell-O Berry Blue became the third most popular Jell-O flavor.

Like Jell-O Apricot, the majority of Jell-O Berry Blue’s ingredients are sugar and gelatin.

Additionally, Jello-O Berry Blue uses Blue 1, which is a food color usually derived from an oil base and coal tar.

Furthermore, Jell-O Berry Blue is a popular flavor for children’s desserts and party food like Jello shots because of its bright blue appeal.

3. Jell-O Blackberry Fusion

Jell-O Blackberry Fusion, which is an infusion of raspberry and blackberry flavors, was launched between 1961 to 1964 along with other mixed fruit flavors.

Like all Jell-O flavors, Jell-O Blackberry Fusion is artificially flavored and colored. In Jell-O Blackberry Fusion’s case, it’s flavored with Red 40 and Blue 1.

Additionally, Jell-O Blackberry Fusion is gluten-free even if there is no gluten-free certification on the packaging.

4. Jell-O Black Cherry

Jell-O Black Cherry was launched in 1956 alongside the imitation grape and raspberry flavors. During that time, imitation flavors were looked upon favorably.

Similar to Jell-O Blackberry Fusion, Jell-O Black Cherry uses Red 40 and Blue 1 as well to imitate the dark red tint of real black cherries.

Moreover, Jell-O Black Cherry comes in a sugar-free format and as a ready-to-eat snack, therefore making Jell-O Black Cherry a popular choice among consumers.

5. Jell-O Cherry

Jell-O Cherry was launched in 1906 alongside Jell-O Chocolate. However, unlike Jell-O chocolate which was discontinued in 1931, Jell-O Cherry remains in production to this day.

Just like Jell-Black Cherry and Blackberry Fusion, Jell-O Cherry is made with Red 40 and Blue 1 coloring to achieve a cherry-like color.

Furthermore, Jell-Cherry comes in a sugar-free format and is considered a gluten-free product.

6. Jell-O Cranberry

Jell-O Cranberry was launched in 1994 at the same time that Jell-O Grape was reintroduced to the market.

Additionally, Jell-O Cranberry is widely used on holidays like Thanksgiving to make Jello salad or as an ingredient to other cranberry-flavored desserts.

7. Jell-O Fruit Punch

Jell-O Fruit Punch does not specify the type of fruit punch it is trying to imitate or the main flavor it is supposed to have.

Based on the packaging, Jell-O Fruit Punch could be inspired by the flavors of cherry, pineapple, and orange.

Unlike what the name may suggest, Jell-O Fruit Punch does not contain alcohol and is safe for children to consume.

With the combination of Blue 1, Yellow 5, and Red 40, Jell-O Fruit Punch achieves a reddish tint which makes it easy to mistake Jell-O Fruit Punch with Jell-O Cherry.

8. Jell-O Grape

Jell-O Grape came out in 1956 and was originally branded as an imitation flavor alongside Jell-O Black Cherry and Jell-O Black Raspberry.

Eventually, Jell-O Grape grew out of its imitation brand and became one of the staple flavors of Jell-O.

Additionally, Jell-O Grape is made with Blue 2 and Red 40, which are plant-based indigo and a petroleum-based food dye respectively.

9. Jell-O Lemon

Jell-O Lemon was introduced in 1897 and is one of the four original flavors created by Jell-O inventor Pearle Wait.

Moreover, Jell-O Lemon comes in sugar-free and ready-to-eat formats. Additionally, Jell-O Lemon is a popular ingredient in desserts like Jello cheesecakes and chiffon pies.

To achieve the bright yellow appeal of Jell-O Lemon, Yellows 5 and 6 are used, which are both derived from petroleum products.

10. Jell-O Cherry Lemonade

Jell-O Cherry Lemonade is another one of Jell-O’s popular fusion flavors. In Jell-O Cherry Lemonade, you’ll be able to taste a fine blend of cherry and lemonade.

Just like all the other red-colored Jell-O flavors, Jell-O Cherry Lemonade uses Red 40 and Blue 1.

Moreover, Jell-O Cherry Lemonade is a recommended ingredient for Jello shots and lemonade-based desserts.

11. Jell-O Lime

In 1930, Jell-O Lime was launched and Jell-O Lime became such a huge hit among housewives and cooks.

Part of the reason for Jell-O Lime’s popularity is because of the ongoing Jello salad trends of the time and partly because Jell-O Lime came with a recipe book.

Additionally, Jell-O Lime has an appealing green color achieved through the use of Yellow 5 and Blue 1.

Apart from Jello salads, Jell-O Lime is a top choice when it comes to key lime pie.

12. Jell-O Mango

Jell-O Mango is one of the more recent flavors introduced, but quickly Jell-O Mango became in high demand for desserts like mango jelly and Jello pudding.

Like Jell-O Lemon, Jell-O Mango uses Yellow 5 and 6 to get its color. Moreover, Jell-O Mango is known for its excellent imitation of the taste of fresh mango.

13. Jell-O Watermelon

Jell-O Watermelon

Jell-O Watermelon was introduced in 1993, right after Jell-O Blue Berry was launched and right before Jell-O Cranberry entered the market.

Unlike other red-colored Jello, Jell-O Watermelon uses only Red 40 for food color, hence Jell-O Watermelon’s lighter shade.

14. Jell-O Orange

Jell-O Orange was launched in 1897 and is one of the four original flavors of Jell-O. For years, Jell-O Orange was one of the most popular Jell-O flavors in America.

Due to Jell-O Orange’s popularity, Jell-Orange comes in a sugar-free form and a ready-to-eat format.

Additionally, Jell-O Orange has the bright orange appeal of real orange fruits, which is achieved through the combination of Yellow 6 and Red 40 food dyes.

15. Jell-O Peach

Jell-O Peach was introduced to the market in 1907 as one of the new flavors that were hoped to strengthen Jell-O’s success.

However, in 1920, Jell-O Peach had to be discontinued for reasons possibly connected to low demand.

Nonetheless, between 1975 and 1978, Jell-O Peach made a comeback and has continued to be in production to this day.

16. Jell-O Blueberry Pomegranate

Jell-O Blueberry Pomegranate is another fusion flavor by Jell-O that outshined plenty of other flavors, most of which were discontinued over the years.

As its name implies, Jell-O Blueberry pomegranate is an interesting combination of the flavors of blueberry and pomegranate and colored with Red 40 and Blue 1.

17. Jell-O Island Pineapple

Jell-O Island Pineapple was introduced in 1996 alongside Jell-O Peach Passion Fruit. Contrary to popular belief, Jell-O Island Pineapple does not contain real pineapples.

Similar to other Jell-O flavors, Jell-O Island Pineapple is artificially flavored to taste like pineapples and uses Yellow 5 and 6 to get their golden color.

18. Jell-O Raspberry

Jell-O Raspberry was introduced in 1897 alongside the three other original Jell-O flavors.

On account of Jell-O Raspberry’s popularity, three other variants were launched, namely Black Raspberry in 1956, Wild Raspberry in 1968, and Cranberry Raspberry in 1995.

Like Jell-O Watermelon, Jell-O Raspberry uses only Red 40 as its food dye.

19. Jell-O Strawberry

Like Jell-O Raspberry, Jell-O Strawberry was launched in 1897 as one of the four original Jell-O flavors.

Over the years, there would be plenty of Jell-O strawberry-inspired flavors like Wild Strawberry in 1968 and Cranberry Strawberry in 1995.

While some of the strawberry-flavored Jell-O has been discontinued, the original Jell-O Strawberry remains a staple in the Jello market.

20. Jell-O Strawberry Banana

Jell-O Strawberry Banana was launched between 1961 to 1965 alongside numerous fruit fusion flavors, including lemon-lime, pineapple-grapefruit, and orange-banana.

While Jell-O Strawberry Banana is a fusion of strawberry and banana flavors, Jell-O Strawberry Banana uses only Red 40 and is predominantly red.

21. Jell-O Tropical Fusion

Jell-O introduced tropical blends in the market in 1996 to appeal to the Hispanic market. However, it is unclear whether Jell-O Tropical Fusion was included.

Additionally, Jell-O Tropical Fusion does not specify the specific fruits that inspired Jell-O Tropical Fusion.

Based on the packaging, though, it is reasonable to assume that the flavors are cherry, pineapple, and orange, similar to Jell-O Fruit Punch.

Moreover, just like Jell-O Fruit Punch, Jell-O Tropical is also colored with Blue 1, Yellow 5, and Red 40.

22. Jell-O Melon Fusion

Jell-O Melon Fusion is one of the more recent flavors introduced to the market.

While Jell-O Melon Fusion does not say exactly which melon flavors it is mimicking, the packaging does include a small picture of a watermelon, a melon, and a honeydew.

Additionally, Jell-O Melon Fusion does not feature a primary flavor, but the Jello itself is green and is colored using Yellow 5 and Blue 1, which may indicate honeydew as the main flavor.

Check out our other articles to find out the types of Jello, if you can leave Jello out of the fridge, and Jello brands.

Conclusion

Jell-O has introduced over two dozen flavors to the market since Jell-O’s launch in 1897. While most of the flavors were discontinued, some flavors remain in production due to popular demand.

Moreover, all the Jell-O flavors are artificially flavored and contain similar ingredients with the main difference being their food dye and preservatives.

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